Working with Touch ID API in iOS 8 SDK

With every major version release of iOS, Apple ships along a great number of new technologies and frameworks. iOS 8 is going to be released officially pretty soon, and new great stuff awaits both users and developers. This version of iOS brings quite exciting new things, and among them, don’t forget the new programming language named Swift, that Apple presented at the WWDC this summer. So, with this tutorial I would like to welcome you to a series of new posts, in which we are going to work with frameworks introduced in iOS 8, and with improvements made to the existing SDK.

Starting from this tutorial, we are going to develop all the sample applications for the next ones in Swift. Not because it’s a brand new language and it would be cool to get to know it, but mostly because it’s quite possible to become the official language of iOS (and Mac OS) after a while. We have been working with Objective-C for some time, some of us for years, and of course, we don’t mean to forget it. However, as technology evolves, it’s our duty to learn this new language.

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Before I start talking about the topic of this tutorial, I would like to make a few observations regarding Swift, since this is the first time I write about it. I am pretty sure that all of you that you are now reading these lines, you have seen the related WWDC session videos, you have downloaded the e-book, and you’ve read a few (or more) things about Swift. Compared to Objective-C, Swift is much simpler from the point of syntax, the code is much clearer and of course, thanks to the nature of Swift, safer. Furthermore, one could say that reminds a combination of other languages. Even though it’s necessary to get used to a new way of writing code and to forget old habits (such as adding the semicolon ; at the end of each command), there are only a few new things you have to learn in Swift (such as optionals, tuples, new way to handle structures, etc.). If it has been easy for you to develop applications in Objective-C, then it’s really easy to write code in Swift too, and you will find this out through this tutorial. Closing this short talk about Swift, I must say that since this language is new, I recommend you to keep the e-book always open for study, and of course… to read the tutorials at Appcoda!
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Understanding Self Sizing Cells and Dynamic Type in iOS 8

In iOS 8, Apple introduces a new feature for UITableView known as Self Sizing Cells. To me, this is seriously one of the most exciting features for the new SDK. Prior to iOS 8, if you want to display dynamic content in table view with variable height, you would need to calculate the row height manually. Now with iOS 8, Self Sizing Cell provides a solution for displaying dynamic content. In brief, here are what you need to do when using self sizing cells:

  • Define auto layout constraints for your prototype cell
  • Specify the estimatedRowHeight of your table view
  • Set the rowHeight of your table view to UITableViewAutomaticDimension

If we express the last two points in code, it looks like this:

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tableView.estimatedRowHeight = 44.0
tableView.rowHeight = UITableViewAutomaticDimension

With just two lines of code, you instruct the table view to calculate the cell’s size matching its content and render it dynamically. This self sizing cell feature should save you tons of code and time. You’re gonna love it.

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Introduction to UIAlertController, Swift Closures and Enumeration

Among all the changes in iOS 8 SDK, the changes of two commonly-used APIs in UIKit framework are less known. Both UIActionSheet and UIAlertView classes are now replaced by the UIAlertController class.

In iOS 8, whenever you want to display an alert message in your app, you should use UIAlertController instead the two deprecated classes. The action sheet and alert view become the style of the UIAlertController. You choose one of the styles when creating an alert controller. The way to handle button action is redesigned. You no longer use delegate (e.g. UIAlertViewDelegate) to handle user response. When using UIAlertController, you associate actions with the controller and that the action is expressed as a block in Objective-C or closures in Swift.

In this tutorial, I’ll give you an introduction to the UIAlertController and cover how to use the class to present an alert message, as well as, an action sheet. On top of that, I’ll take this opportunity to cover the basics of closures and enumeration in Swift.

UIAlertController Introduction

Okay, let’s get started.
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Understanding Key-Value Observing and Coding

In programming, one of the most commonly accepted facts is that the flow of a program depends on the value of the various variables and properties you use. You just have to think how many times during an application development you have to check for your properties’ values, and based on them to drive the execution of the code to one or another way. Even more, think of how many times you need to check if an object has been added to an array, or if it has been removed from it. So, being aware of the changes that happen to the properties of your classes is a vital part of the programming process.

There are various ways that let us be notified when a property gets changed. For example, if you have a method to set a property’s value, or you just override a setter method, you can send a notification (NSNotification) to notify an observer about that change, and then perform the proper actions based on the value that was set. If you are familiarized with notifications, then using them would not be a problem at all if you would want to use them for being aware about changes in properties, but the truth is that doing so for a great number of properties would require to send and observe for a great number of notifications as well, and that could lead to a lot of extra code writing.

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Nevertheless, there is a much better way to observe for changes in properties, and Apple uses it a lot in its own software. That way is not used a lot by programmers because it seems hard to be learnt, however this is not true. Once you get to know it, you’ll probably love it and you’ll see that it’s much effortless and easier to track down changes on single properties or collections, such as arrays. This method is called Key-Value Observing, but is mostly known as KVO.

Key-Value Observing (KVO) is related directly to another powerful and important mechanism, named Key-Value Coding, or KVC. Actually, any property you want to observe for changes must be Key-Value Coding compliant, but we will talk more about that later. The important thing for now is to make clear that both of them provide a really powerful and efficient way to write code, and knowing how to handle them can definitely turn you into a more skilled and advanced programmer.
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Understanding XML and JSON Parsing in iOS Programming

One of the most important tasks that a developer has to deal with when creating applications is the data handing and manipulation. Data can be expressed in many different formats, and mastering at least the most known of them consists of a key ability for every single programmer. Speaking for mobile applications specifically now, it’s quite common nowadays for them to exchange data with web applications. In such cases, the way that data is expressed may vary, but usually is preferred either the JSON or the XML format.

iOS SDK provides classes for handling both of them. For managing JSON data, there is the NSJSONSerialization class. This one allows to easily convert a JSON data into a Foundation object (NSArray, NSDictionary), and the other way round. For parsing XML data, iOS offers the NSXMLParser class, which takes charge of doing all the hard work, and through some useful delegate methods gives us the tools we need for handling each step of the parsing.

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Introduction to Auto Layout

Editor’s note: If you’ve downloaded the Xcode 6 beta and played around with it, one thing you may notice is the change of Interface Builder. The default view controller is now wider and doesn’t look like an iPhone 5. When you position a button in the center of the view and run the app, it doesn’t look good. The button is not centered properly.

What’s wrong? How can you make it right? The answer is Auto Layout. Auto Layout is a constraint-based layout system. It allows developers to create an adaptive interface that responds appropriately to changes in screen size and device orientation. We seldom talk about Auto Layout in our tutorials. Some beginners find it hard to learn and avoid using it. Starting from Xcode 6, you should learn to love Auto Layout. Apple is expected to release 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch iPhone 6 this fall. Without using Auto Layout, it would be very hard for you to build an app that supports all screen sizes.

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So starting from this week, we’ll publish a series of articles about Auto Layout. We’ll start with the basics.

Enter the introduction of Auto Layout by Ziad.

I know that there are many developers who hates Auto Layout, maybe because it’s relatively new or it’s hard to use for the very first time. But believe me, once you get comfortable with it, it becomes one of your greatest tools that you can’t live without when developing your app. In this tutorial, I will give you a very brief introduction of Auto Layout.
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Introduction to UIActionSheet and UIPopoverController

All mobile applications, no matter what they are about, they have one common and obvious characteristic: They offer interaction, which means that they are not static, but require input or actions needed to be taken by users from time to time in order to function properly. One quite usual behavior, is the ability to provide ways that allow users to make choices or take decisions where it’s needed, and ultimately act that way on the applications’ data or functionalities. iOS SDK provides a pre-made action-taking view controller, the UIActionSheet.

Action sheets consist of a really convenient and fast way to display a bunch of options that the user should select from, and it is widely used in great number of applications. Its disadvantage though is that it adopts the iOS’s look and feel without being able to be graphically modified, therefore it might not fit to applications with customized GUI.

Beyond action sheets, another very important and cool tool designed especially for the iPad, is the UIPopoverController. A popover controller is actually a container which is used to display content on top of another content. What makes it unique is the fact that it can be displayed almost everywhere around the screen of the iPad, but usually it’s shown near to the button that caused its appearing with a nice arrow pointing to the button’s direction. iOS by default encloses action sheets in popover controllers on iPad, but they can also be manually created for custom content.

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Before we begin working with those two view controllers, let’s do some more talking about them in order to get to know their basics, and then we’ll proceed on how to use them in projects. So, let me start by telling that both the UIActionSheet and UIPopoverController exist to serve the same purpose, and that is to provide a quick way for presenting content to the user. This content can be either a button-based menu (action sheet), or anything else originating from a view controller (popover controller). Undoubtably, they are both pretty useful tools, and everyone developing for iOS should master both of them. Their great difference lies to where each one is used, and that’s the essential fact you should be aware of: An action sheet can be used on any iOS device (iPhone, iPad), but a popover controller can be used only on iPad, as I have already said.
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iOS Programming 101: How To Create Swipeable Table View Cell to Display More Options

When iOS 7 was first released, one of the many visual changes that particularly interested me was the swipe-to-delete gestures in the Mail app. By now you should be very familiar with the feature. After you swipe a table cell, you’ll see the Trash button, plus a new button named More. The More button will bring up an action sheet that shows a list of options such as Reply, Flag, etc.

I thought it’s a great feature to provide additional options for manipulating a table record. However, as you know, Apple didn’t make this feature available to developers in iOS 7. You can only create the swipe-to-delete option in table cell. The More feature is only limited to the stock Mail app. I have no idea why Apple keeps such great feature to its own app. Fortunately, some developers have created free solutions (such as UITableView-Swipe-for-Options, MCSwipeTableViewCell) and made them available freely.

In this tutorial, I’ll use SWTableViewCell and see how to implement swipe-to-show-options feature in your app. SWTableViewCell is pretty to easy to use. If you understand how to implement UITableView, you shouldn’t have any problem with SWTableViewCell. On top of that, it supports utility buttons on both swipe directions. You’ll understand what it means in a minute.

Swipeable UITableViewCell

Let’s get started and build our demo app.
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Understanding Git Source Control in Xcode

During an application development process, a quite significant part is the way developers manage to keep track of the changes been made over time. It really consists of a necessary need to be able to store and handle copies of working code versions in various stable stages, and revert back to them when bugs or problems arise. Even more, when a number of programmers work at the same project, keeping track of all changes is a one-way path. Fortunately, developers don’t have to discover their own way to do all that, as there are special software solutions, called Version Control Systems.

A version control system, or in other words a revision control system, is actually a (software) mechanism that is capable of monitoring changes performed to code files over time and storing them for future reference. Besides that, it can also save extra essential data, such as the developer who made the changes, when did they happen, what was actually modified, and other kind of historical and not only data. Moreover, such a system provides the ability to compare various versions of the code, revert to a previous version of either specific files or a whole project if needed, and eventually implement a bug-free product by tracking down any malicious code.

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Using a version control system, developers can work on different paths of a project, commonly named branches, and when their piece of project is ready, everything is put together so the final release of the application can be built. This process is called merging, and it consists of a special characteristic of version control systems. Actually, that fashion of work is mandatory in teams of developers and software companies, where each one if responsible for a project’s part, and at the end everything must be gathered up and put in one place.

For single developers it is not required to use a version control system, however is highly recommended, as with it’s much more easier to track down bugs or going back to stable and working versions of code, once a dead end appears or for some reason everything is messed up. The truth is that a great number of lone-rider programmers, especially the new ones, do not use such a system at all, and is common to manually keep copies of their projects when they are about to add new features or generally modify them. That’s a really bad habit, as a source control system does all that much better and efficiently, providing at the same time all the extra capabilities previously described.
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